Puget Sound Access

Interesting guests and compelling conversations about local issues.

Sunday, September 21
5:30am -

This week we meet Jennifer Ott, Staff Historian from Historylink.org.

With the Seattle waterfront going through major changes, we take time this week to look back at the history of Seattle’s waterfront. Jennifer is able to give us an historical perspective on Seattle’s waterfront development.
Historylink.org is an online encyclopedia of Washington State and local history. It provides a free, authoritative, and easily accessible history reference for the benefit of students, teachers, journalists, scholars, researchers, and the general public.
Jennifer is able to take us all the way back to when the Yesler sawmill stood on a pier 900 feet long over tide flats, to finally building a seawall in the 1930s, to construction of the viaduct, and up to the viaduct’s demise and the tunnel boring machine named Bertha.
Learn more about Seattle and Washington’s past online at www.Historylink.org

 

Sunday, September 14
5:30am -

This week we speak with Kenneth Himma, Ph.D., Professor of Philosophy atSeattle Pacific University.

Dr. Himma has contributed to a new book titled How To Achieve A Heaven On Earth, 101 insightful essays from the world’s greatest thinkers, leaders, and writers.  Professor Himma’s piece is titled The Obligation To Help The Poor.

It is a stimulating conversation that looks at our individual and societal obligation to the poor among us from both a secular and non-secular viewpoint.

http://www.heavenonearth.org/

Sunday, September 7
5:30am -

This week we speak with Youth Therapist and Counselor Brandon Stogsdill from Sound Mental Health.
Sound Mental Health is a private non-profit that has been helping families in King County for more than 40 years with a variety of counseling, addiction services, and many more programs.
Brandon has got a unique approach in his therapy with youth that he calls the FAST approach; Functional Action Sports Therapy, that
fuses action sports such as indoor skydiving, snow boarding, long boarding, or BMX biking with mental health therapy for at-risk youth. Brandon has a real grasp on this as he was what you would call a former troubled youth himself. This ground breaking work is already, and will continue to do some great things to reach kids in distress.
Learn more online at www.smh.org

Sunday, August 31
5:30am -

This week we meet Michael Stewart and Charles Di Bona from Boyer Children’s Clinic. Michael is the Executive Director and Charles is not only a member of the Board of Directors, but is the parent of a graduate of Boyer.
Boyer Children’s Clinic has been serving children with developmental delays and neuromuscalar disorders in Seattle for over 70 years. No one is turned away for service due to an inability to pay at this clinic for children 3 years and under. Not only are the children given the education, therapy, and socialization they need; but the parents and families are included in a comprehensive way that allows the family to learn and grow with the knowledge it takes to raise a child of special needs.
Boyer is looking to expand next year with a new facility in northeast Seattle.
Learn more on line at www.boyercc.org

 

Sunday, August 24
5:30am -

This week our guest is film producer Jane Charles. SOLD the movie tells the story of Lakshmi, a young girl who is trafficked from her simple mountain village in Nepal to a brothel in India. This film illustrates the horrific reality of child trafficking in an unforgettable way, a crime experienced by millions around the world each year.
Inspired by her eye-opening experiences while making the film, Jane came home to find that Seattle and King County have one of the highest levels of commercially sexually exploited youth in the U.S.. She and several like minded women formed the non-profit Stolen Youth with a goal of raising funds and awareness to support the rescue and recovery of our community’s sexually exploited youth.
SOLD the movie is currently on the Film Festival circuit and will have a general release in the spring.
Learn more online at http://stolenyouth.org/ and http://www.soldthemovie.com/

 

Sunday, August 17
5:30am -

This week we speak with Teresa Knapp; Program Development Officer at International Student Exchange.
International Student Exchange (ISE) is a world class organization that brings exchange students to the United States to live with loving American host families. Teresa describes both the practical aspects as well as the interpersonal/intangible perks of hosting foreign students. American students are also invited to go outbound to learn and study in different countries.  Learn more online at www.iseusa.com or call Teresa direct at 1-844-556-6688.

Sunday, August 10
5:30am

The UWCATS program has a two-fold positive effect for the community; research and treatment.
Dr. Belinda Graham and her colleagues Libby Marks and Alissa Jerud discuss their research into the treatment of PTSD to help find best practices for treatment options. To facilitate this research they offer free of charge treatment to volunteer participants.
Experiencing a trauma can be extremely upsetting and can cause a number of emotional difficulties. Many of the feelings and changes that people may be having after experiencing trauma are normal. In fact, most people who experience a major trauma have severe problems in the immediate aftermath. However, for some people, some symptoms such as avoidance or feeling a threat, last for a long time. If you are still experiencing emotional difficulties or daily impairments three months or more after you experienced a trauma, you may have PTSD.
To learn more or to volunteer as a participant, call 206-685-3617 or visit www.ptsdoptions.org

 

Sunday, August 3
5:30am

Being Seafair Sunday, this week’s show centers on hydroplanes. Hydroplanes make huge roostertails; they also make for great story telling as the sport has always had huge personalities.
This week we have the good fortune to listen to two people who know all about Seattle’s Seafair boat racing history; Hall of Fame hydroplane driver Chip Hanauer as well as the Director of the Hydroplane and Raceboat Museum, David Williams.
Chip and David offer their unique perspective of history, stories, and insights into the colorful and often controversial sport of unlimited hydroplane racing.
Learn more online at www.thunderboats.org

 

Sunday, July 27
5:30am

This week we get to speak with Vicky Lee, the Director of Education & Performance Programs at The Seattle Theatre Group.
The Seattle Theatre Group (STG) is made up of The Paramount Theatre, The Moore Theatre, and The Neptune Theatre; most people don’t know that they are a non profit or that they have an education department!
It is part of the mission of the STG to not only entertain us, but to make diverse performing arts and education an integral part of our region’s rich cultural identity while keeping these three landmark venues alive and vibrant.
Vicky describes a number of opportunities for Seattle youth, whether they are interested in songwriting, dance, or theater.
Learn more online at www.stgpresents.org

Sunday, July 20
5:30am

This week we meet Nate Murphy and Chad Haight from Bremerton’s historic Admiral Theatre.
The Admiral Theatre was built as World War II was beginning and we discuss some of the history as well as its rebirth as a non-profit in the late 1980s.
The Admiral now produces a variety of shows, including national touring concerts, dinner theater, comedy, films, educational programs and more.
The upcoming season begins in September with a Gala night.
Learn more at www.admiraltheatre.org

Sunday, July 13
5:30am

This week we get to hear about the bright future of some of our state’s young people as we speak with the Washington chapter of DECA.
Shanna LaMar, Executive Director and Mike Seeley, incoming State President (also a senior at Skyline High School) share with us the unique experience that can be gained by students through DECA classes, clubs and competitions.
By giving students hands-on experience in the fields of marketing, business, and entrepreneurship, Washington DECA teaches leadership characteristics that mold high school students into character-driven leaders.
Learn more online at www.wadeca.org

Sunday, July 6
5:30am

There’s a group of people amongst us that deserve our thanks and appreciation before it’s too late. World War II veterans are dying at a rate of over 900 per day and this week we get to speak with Denise Rouleau; a Board Member of Puget Sound Honor Flight. It is their mission to give the World War II veterans in Western Washington “one last mission”, that of flying them back to Washington D.C. to see the World War II Memorial that was built in their honor.
The Honor Flight supplies air fare, hotel accommodations, and a chaperoned visit to the national monuments that honor them. All at no cost to the veterans.
Denise also outlines ways for the rest of us to participate in showing our gratitude to honor them.
Learn more online at www.pugetsoundhonorflight.org

Sunday, June 29
5:30am

Our guests this week are Sharon Beaudoin: Chief Program Officer, & Liz Jaquette: Senior Manager of Programs from WithinReach.  WithinReach is dedicated to seeing that all families in Washington State are healthy by connecting them to the services they need. Last year they connected more than 230,000 people to life-saving programs like Medicaid, CHIP, Basic Food and WIC.  Washington is the 15th hungriest state in the U.S., and roughly one quarter of all Washington families with children struggle to put food on the table regularly.  For the 482,000 children who rely on free or reduced price school meals to fill their bellies during the school year, summertime presents an especially daunting challenge. Families with children can expect to spend about $300 more per month on groceries when school is out. For families who already stretch their budgets to make ends meet, time out of school means less food to go around, and more kids going hungry every day.  The goal of the Summer Meals partnership is to end summer hunger for kids by helping more kids and families find Summer Meals sites in their communities Learn more online at www.withinreach.org or locate a summer meal distribution center by calling 1-888-436-6392.

 

Sunday, June 22
5:30 am

Seattle is celebrating its 65th year of Seafair, and with us to share the variety, events, history and newest changes are President and CEO of Seafair Beth Knox, as well as Oberto hydroplane sponsor Larry Oberto.
What started out as a celebration of Seattle’s centennial has become one of the nations largest and most beloved festivals. Beth and Larry give insight on what it means to the city, citizens and businesses to throw an area wide party celebrating ourselves each year.
Seafair Pirates land at Alki on June 28, Milk Carton Boat Derby at Green Lake is July 12, The Torchlight Parade is July 6th and the Albert Lee Hydroplane race on Lake Washington will be contested August 1-3.
Learn more online at www.seafair.com and www.facebook.com/seafair

Sunday, June 15
5:30am

This week we are joined by the Asian Counseling and Referral Service. Owen Lei; Communications Manager, Miguel Saldin: Senior Nutrition & Assistance Manager, and Ioka Tasi; Food Bank Volunteer.
The Asian Counseling and Referral Service has been providing, not only food bank support, but a wide variety of social services in a culturally competent way that connects to the Asian and Pacific Islander community in ways that other agencies don’t. The ACRS Food Bank is among the busiest food banks in King County, distributing about 18,600 pounds of food each week. More than 40% of emergency food recipients in Western Washington are “food insecure,” meaning they do not know when they will eat again, and often go to bed hungry.
The 24th annual Walk for Rice is on Saturday, June 28th at Seward Park and its fundraising buys rice and other food for ACRS Food Bank Clients.
Learn more about Asian Counseling and Referral Service at www.acrs.org
Form a Walk for Rice team or support someone else at www.walkforrice.org

Sunday, June 8
5:30am

This week our guests are from Year Up; a group that offers a one-year, intensive training program that provides low-income young adults, ages 18-24, with a combination of hands-on skill development, college credits, corporate internships, and support.
Lisa Chin is the Executive Director and Marquez Taylor is the Admission and Outreach Coordinator at Year Up and they tell us of the need for technically savvy employees in the northwest. For the first six months of the program, students develop technical and professional skills in the classroom. During the second six months they are placed in an internship at one of Year Up’s corporate partners. Students earn college credits and a weekly stipend, and are supported by staff advisors, professional mentors, dedicated social services staff, and a powerful network of community-based partners.
Learn more at www.yearup.org

Sunday, June 1
5:30am

This week we speak with Chris Sullivan, the Youth & Family Programs Manager at The Pacific Science Center.
Not only is the Pacific Science Center a world class science museum that has served Seattle well since 1962; it has also been offering a summer camp program since the early 1980s. This year’s theme is Camps For Curious Minds and Chris tells us that the goal of such camps is to have students asking more questions after their week of camp than they had before. The subjects focus on STEM disciplines. (science, technology, engineering, and mathematics) Camps are offered for everyone from Preschool through High School and at several locations in Seattle and throughout the East side.
Learn more and register online at www.pacificsciencecenter.org

Sunday, May 18
5:30am

Our guest this week is David Richart, the Executive Director at Komen Puget Sound.
Sunday, June 1st is the 21st annual Susan G. Komen Race for The Cure and with hopes of raising one million dollars; David tells us of the uses for such funds, the need in our community and so much more about breast cancer. It turns out that Washington has one of the highest incidences of breast cancer in the country. But we also have some of the best research facilities in the country as well with Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center and the University of Washington.
Register for the Race for the Cure and learn more about breast cancer online at www.komenpugetsound.org

Sunday, May 18
5:30am

Our guests this week want to put a stop to bullying and they’ve enlisted some big names to help.
We speak with Mia Doces, Anti-Bullying specialist at Committee for Children. And from the Seattle Mariners; Gregg Greene, the Senior Director of Marketing, and Gina Hasson, the Senior Director of Community Relations.
The Seattle Mariners are in the midst of an Anti-Bullying campaign featuring ace pitcher Felix Hernandez and local grammy winning rapper Macklemore.
Almost 30 percent of teens in the United States are estimated to be involved in bullying as either a bully, a target of bullying, or both. Bullying can lead teenagers to feel tense, anxious, and afraid. It can affect their concentration in school, and can lead them to avoid school in some cases.
Learn more online at http://seattle.mariners.mlb.com/sea/fan_forum/changethegame.jsp and www.cfchildren.org

 

Sunday, May 11
5:30am

This week we ought to be TV instead of Radio….we meet wildlife photographer Steven Gnam and Publisher Helen Cherullo. Steven’s new book Crown of the Continent: The Wildest Rockies is published by Braided River, a non-profit book publisher whose mission is not only to celebrate wildlife, wild places and local culture through art; but to inspire stewardship of the natural world through that art and education.  Steven will present his photos and speak at The Mountaineers Program Center in Seattle on July 24th.
Learn more online at www.braidedriver.org and enjoy some of Steven Gnam’s book at www.wildestrockies.org

Sunday, May 4
5:30am

This week we speak with Mark Johnson, the Director of Development and Communications at Volunteers of America, Western Washington.  Mark reminds us of the need to stay generous with our donations of both treasure and time during the spring and summer. People tend to remember people less fortunate than themselves during the Holiday Season yet the need does not drop off now that we’ve hit the warmer months.  Saturday, the 10th of May the National Letter Carriers Union has their annual food drive: Stamp Out Hunger. Mark encourages us all to leave a few cans of food in our mailbox on Saturday.  Learn more at www.voaww.org

Sunday, April 27
5:30amEdward Albee’s heavy-weight play Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf is The Seattle Repertory Theatre’s current production. How does the Seattle Rep keep us engaged and entertained simultaneously and how have they done it for more than 50 years?
This week we speak with lead actor in “Virginia Woolf” R. Hamilton Wright, and the play’s director Braden Abraham about keeping theater relevant to today’s audience in such an intense play while staying true to the playwright’s original themes and ideas.
Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf plays at the Bagley Wright Theatre through May 18.  Learn more at www.seattlerep.org

Sunday, April 20
5:30am

Earth Day is Tuesday, A pril 22.  This week we celebrate Earth Day with Tom Watson, King County’s Recycling and Environmental Services Project Manager.  Tom gives us the low down on how we can make individual changes and choices that will have an impact on not only the Puget Sound environment, but globally as well.  We talk Climate Change, toxins around the house, how to dispose  of those questionable items, and lots more.  Tom encourages us all to take action on something this year for our own benefit and the long-term survival of the planet.  Learn more online or ask Tom questions directly at www.kcecoconsumer.com

Sunday, April 13
5:30am

Music has healing power, and our guests this week have a practical and unique way to demonstrate that mystical connection.
This week we talk with the founders and Directors of The Melodic Caring Project; Levi and Stephanie Ware.  The Melodic Caring Project is about an artist or band playing a live and extremely personal show for a select group of patients (sick kids and teenagers) via the internet directly to the patient’s hospital bed or home where they can watch the show in the comfort and anonymity of their own room.  Stephanie and Levi describe to us how the patient’s family and friends join in and send real-time messages of encouragement and love to create a true sense of community and support. Go online to learn more about The Melodic Caring Project, including upcoming concerts with Switchfoot and The Presidents of the United States of America.
www.melodiccaringproject.org

Sunday, March 23
5:30am

This week we speak with Megan Wegner, the Program Director and Leah Parker, a long time participant at the Tavon Center who has cerebral palsy.
The Tavon Center is a program for disabled young adults. For most young people, graduation from high school is a step toward the future. It is an exciting time of finding independence, attending college, traveling or starting a career. But what happens to the young person with a disability upon leaving high school? The transition to adulthood is exceedingly complex. For most, they no longer see friends, activities and social interactions are decreased, and the opportunity to learn and experience new things is severely limited.Tavon Center in Issaquah provides a meaningful daily experience for young adults with disabilities in a caring, productive environment. Through working in the gardens, caring for animals, practicing daily living activities, and building interpersonal skills, participants gain capability and confidence.
Learn more online at www.tavoncenter.org

Sunday, March 16
5:30am

This week we look at a great model for public and private partnerships for the public good when King County Drug Diversion Court’s Tom Essex and David Uhl from Recovery Cafe discuss options for those in our criminal justice system that are fighting chemical addiction.  Drug Court offers an alternative to jail time for felony drug convictions of those with addictions that is both cheaper for the tax-payer and has a track record of helping those with their recovery. Sent to non-profits like Recovery Cafe, the lives of drug offenders can be changed and turned around. That helps them individually and society as they move from being a drain on the system to becoming a contributing member of society.  Learn more about King County Drug Diversion Court and Recovery Cafe on line at: http://www.kingcounty.gov/courts/DrugCourt and http://www.recoverycafe.org/

 

Sunday, March 9
5:30am

This week we talk with Robin Crowder, Marketing & Development Director; and Brenda Vanderloop, Public Relations Consultant for 21 Acres Center for Local Food and Sustainable Living.  21 Acres is a nonprofit agricultural and environmental learning center show-casing the agricultural heritage of our region. 21 Acres is an actual living laboratory that demonstrates sustainable design and technologies as well as ways to maximize the beneficial aspects of fresh local produce and farm products. Supporting the farm and school, 21 Acres features a retail market, commercial kitchen and special event rental space, all housed on the property and within the LEED Platinum Certified green building.  Learn more at www.21acres.org

Sunday, March 2
5:30am

With the Seattle waterfront going through major changes, we take time this week to look back at the history of Seattle’s waterfront. Jennifer Ott is a Staff Historian at Historylink.org.  Historylink.org is an online encyclopedia of Washington State and local history. It provides a free, authoritative, and easily accessible history reference for the benefit of students, teachers, journalists, scholars, researchers, and the general public.
Jennifer is able to take us all the way back to when the Yesler sawmill stood on a pier 900 feet long over tide flats, to finally building a seawall in the 1930s, to construction of the viaduct, and up to the viaduct’s demise and the tunnel boring machine named Bertha.
Learn more about Seattle and Washington’s past online at www.Historylink.org